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Google Wave on Ulitzer Invites left: 26 8 Looks like Google sent out another bunch of invitations for Wave & since most of my friends are already on Wave, I thought why not give it away. So, in case you want one, just drop a comment (don’t forget to protect it against spamming by substituting @ with [at] & the likes) or mail with your name & email address. I’ll update the counter on top as I progress with the giveaway. I’ve used Wave to collaborate on a couple of projects in the last couple of weeks. Some features are not yet functional, but it does look pretty promising. And yes, it seems that Wave is more responsive on Google Chrome than Firefox. P.S. It wouldn’t hurt if you did your bit for the Water initiative by scrolling down to the Socialvibe widget on the sidebar & adding your signature to the cause on my blog. Update (26/11): Sent out 6 invitations based... (more)

Google Fires First Shot in Brewing Codec War

Google fired a shot across Apple's bow Wednesday and considering the way things have been going Apple will probably seek to return fire in the not-too-distant future with an armor-piercing lawsuit. The latest fray started when Google got up at the Google I/O developers conference - like it was widely expected to do - and open sourced VP8, the video codec it got when it acquired On2 Technologies, the video compression house, in February for about $125 million. VP8 will try to displace H.264, the proprietary codec that Apple and Microsoft are invested in. VP8 is now part of a thing called the WebM project, which also includes the open source Ogg Vorbis audio format, and a container format based on a subset of the open source Matroska multimedia container. Needless to say, WebM is royalty-free and already has the support of the majority of the browser community: the Mo... (more)

A Look at CumuLogic’s Java PaaS for Clouds

CumuLogic is a cloud computing company founded by Sun Microsystems’ alumni. The company has developed a Java Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) software that makes it easier and faster to develop and deploy Java applications (apps) in the cloud. By automating the management of the runtime environments for developing and deploying Java apps in the cloud, including automated scaling, CumuLogic’s Java PaaS can reduce the current time these steps take from upwards of multiple weeks to under a day. Cloud computing is not just about Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS). The cloud is about the applications, and getting them to your customers in a timely and effective way. CumuLogic’s Java PaaS is now in beta with general availability coming soon. Their offering provides a no-lock in PaaS solution for Java apps that works on either public or private clouds. An enterprise can easil... (more)

Cloud Foundry vs Google App Engine

PaaS is nothing but uploading your small kernel of code with business logic and the PaaS service provider will run that code on allocated computing and storage instances. The aim of PaaS is to let the developers concentrate on developing their code rather than creating and maintaining their ecosystem required for it. When Google launched App Engine in 2008 it had very basic functionalities but gradually it has evolved to support much good functionality like Channel APIs. But when it comes to language support, selection of cloud, selection of database, control over database, Cloud foundry gives great amount of flexibility as compared to App Engine. Also, when it comes to supporting Java packages also, Google App Engine doesn’t allow developers to free their arms as there are quite a few important packages which are still not part of App Engine’s white list. It’s be... (more)

How Government Early-Adopters Use Cloud Services

What are the best practices for deploying managed cloud services? Case studies have now confirmed that cloud services can be a better, faster, less expensive and less risky way to source Information and Communications Technology (ICT) solutions, according to the latest market study by Ovum. Results from recent research conducted by Ovum details the experiences of five public sector organizations that have successfully deployed cloud services -- either with Infrastructure-as-Service (IaaS), Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) or Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS). Highlighting the known benefits and the catalysts that empower organizations to embrace the cloud service delivery model, Ovum says they have developed a framework to assist government agencies in understanding the organizational factors associated with early adoption of managed cloud services. Moving Beyond Analysis Paral... (more)

8 Tips for Going Paperless In Your Small Business

8 Tips for Going Paperless In Your Small Business Ray Coleman is a small business owner who writes about money management, green living, and sustainability.   One of the great benefits of the modern age is the ability of small businesses to conduct a majority of their operations in the digital realm. Eliminating the need for bulky file cabinets, storage facilities, photocopiers, printers, and scanners can reduce overhead dramatically. Replacing costly courier services with emails, and swapping out newsletters and solicitations for social media and web-based marketing programs means serious cost savings, as well. Essentially, all of this comes down to replacing paper with pixels. By taking your business green, you're not only helping the environment, you're freeing up a ton of working capital for your venture – and often creating a better and preferred experience f... (more)

2007 - 2014 - 2021 : deux septennats, pour changer le monde des Systèmes d’Information (première partie)

  Je comprends de moins en moins les informaticiens pessimistes : nous vivons une époque formidable et tout reste à faire pour améliorer les usages de l’informatique dans les entreprises. Nous sommes à mi-parcours d’une révolution que j’ai appelée la R2I, la Révolution Industrielle Informatique. Dès 2012, j’avais écrit une série de six billets sur le sujet. Il faudra deux septennats pour que cette R2I arrive à son terme, et ils seront très différents. Dans cette première partie, je ferai le point sur de ce qui c’est passé entre 2007 et 2014. Pendant ce septennat, tous les composants essentiels d’une informatique moderne sont nés et ont atteint un niveau de maturité élevé. Dans la deuxième partie, j’anticiperai ce qui pourrait se passer entre 2014 et 2021.    2007 - 2014 : tous les composants de la R2I se mettent en place  Et si nous faisions un rapide retour en a... (more)

Google To Debut Its "Beacon" Internet Of Things Technology At @ThingsExpo

Google To Debut "Physical Web Beacon" at @ThingsExpo Silicon Valley In his session at Internet of @ThingsExpo, Google's Scott Jenson will discuss how the Physical Web incorporates beacons that can be put in any small retail store, for example, so that every store now has "an app" for its customers. The Physical Web is an open standard so any device can broadcast a URL wirelessly, so any phone/tablet/watch nearby can see and rank those devices. When the user taps on one, they just go to that web page. It's really that simple. It's about thinking small, enabling micro-information (what is in my prescription bottle) or micro interaction (can I buy a candy bar). Scott Jenson leads a project called The Physical Web within the Chrome team at Google. Project members are working to take the scalability and openness of the web and use it to talk to the exponentially explodi... (more)

Google App Engine Learns to Speak Java

Google's now year-old App Engine infrastructure, previously limited to running only programs written in a particular species of Python, a less-than-mainstream tongue but an internal Google favorite, is learning to accept programs written in Java. With the move, Google is reaching out to a broader base and interfacing with what it acknowledges are "businesses' existing technologies." Apparently Google is using JVM 1.6 which means it should be able to support Ruby on Rails too. App Engine's masters say Java was the first and most popular feature requested and that those requests extended to the other programming languages that have been implemented on top of the Java virtual machine along with the web frameworks and libraries. It seems that marrying Java to Google's infrastructure is no mean feat. Google is currently testing the outcome. It can't guarantee that all the to... (more)

Cloud Computing Strategy

(5sahjdcb8k) This post is triggered by John Gannon asking me a question about “the implication of VMware acquisition of Spring Source?” VMware: I already have the most popular virtualization software and I will integrate Spring Source and create the best PaaS offering. Amazon EC2: I am extending my cloud facility to a virtual private environment so that you security concerns are taken care. Microsoft: I am giving you a platform which is very similar to what you use so that you can seamlessly extend your application to the cloud and even the developers can continue to use the same set of tools. IaaS: Infrastructure as a Service   PaaS: Platform as a Service   SaaS: Software as a Service   The proposition: The proposition: The proposition: I will give you a virtual machine in the cloud which you can provision any time you want You pay for what you use You can scale ... (more)

Instant Professionalism Online Despite Yourself...with Ulitzer

Personal Branding on Ulitzer I read an article by an author on Ulitzer.com and was amazed at the professional image it provided him. I immediately researched Ulitzer to see if there was yet hope for me. I am a technology blogger on the subject of mobile computing strategies.  As I was doing research I came across the author Ian Thain, a fellow mobile computing blogger, who had a very professional website on Ulitzer (www.ulitzer.com). Professional envy motivated me to investigate this thing called Ulitzer. Ian's website looked like he had spent a great deal of time and money on it - all things I am short on. I carefully studied Ian's website to see how it was set up.  It looked like an expensive industry portal with colorful graphics, animation and industry news. It had tabs that filtered articles, by most popular, by date, etc.  I have blogged for over 5 years so... (more)